Building Teams

My top 10 takeaways (& one regret) from #Fintech20Ireland

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(L-R) Thomas Olszewski of Frontline Ventures, Mary McKenna, Pete Townsend of Norio Ventures, Alan Costello of NDRC

On Thursday I was delighted to participate in #Fintech20Ireland at UCD as a speaker/panel member.  The audience was a mix of experienced fintech and blockchain professionals working across the financial and insurance services spectrum in Ireland and beyond.  Some were startup founders, some were thinking about starting companies, some were well established and experienced practitioners.  Others were financiers, investors & sponsors.  Thank you to Simon Cocking, John Armstrong and the rest of the Irish Tech News team for running the event and for inviting me to speak.

I talked (honestly) about my own experience of angel investing from the angel investor perspective & I also covered the right & wrong ways to go about “bagging” an angel like me from a founder or startup perspective.  I do this talk because I see so many founding teams getting this so wrong.  I’ve written my tips on “How to Catch an Angel” up recently as a blog here.

We’re living in a time when there are so many events happening that it’s more important than ever to make sure that events you run or attend generate value for you so I thought it would be a good exercise for me to summarise the value I derived from participating & being at #Fintech20Ireland.

These were my key takeaways from the day:

  • Networking – this is always going to be top of my list because I believe that having the right network is the solution to most challenges encountered in business. #Fintech20Ireland allowed me to catch up with people I already knew, meet some new people and meet in real life a few people I’ve known for a while online.  If a few quality additions to your existing network is the only benefit you derive from attending a conference or event then in my view that probably justifies the time you’ve spent.
  • Following on from the previous point, I got offered some work by someone in the audience who’d been looking for specialist e-learning expertise – pure happenstance that I’d mentioned my own e-learning background briefly in my intro.  Serendipity is always nice.
  • I got to meet some other early stage investors that I didn’t already know. As I always say angel investing is a team sport so it’s good for me to meet other investors & hear what they’re interested in and more to the point what they’re investing their time and money in.  It’s good for me but it’s also good for my portfolio companies as investment is usually an ongoing process so it’s useful to be on the radar of a lot of different people.
  • Meeting & hearing from the numerous innovative Irish companies who are transforming financial services and who were present on the day. Giles O’Neill from Enterprise Ireland reminded us early in the day exactly what Ireland has going for it in the fintech space – an existing ecosystem, multinationals & startups working side by side, good & improving international links (I noticed 10 new US routes announced by Aer Lingus yesterday & don’t forget you clear US immigration before you even leave Irish soil), coverage of global fintech hot spots by the EI in-country teams, previous huge international success of some Irish fintech companies.  Giles didn’t make this next point but I will.  Brexit clearly offers huge opportunity for Ireland in terms of fintech and indeed financial services.
  • I met Barbara Diehl, Director of UCD Innovation Academy. Barbara used to work at Said Business School Oxford & I’m a member of SBS’s network of experts.  Colleagues at SBS had made an email intro for us some months back but we’d never actually met.  Barbara was also moderating an innovation panel on the day so I got to see her at work before we had our chat.  It’s always useful to see if there’s anyone else from your wider network you can meet who works in the venue where the event you’re attending is taking place – especially if it’s a large university or corporate or government building.
  • My favourite quote of the day came from Charles Dowd, CEO of money messaging app Plynk. The “tips for startups” panel members were asked what success looks like.  Always a great question to ask a startup.  Charles replied “Success equals doing what you love – but with metrics”.  I love it.
  • There was an incredible Gartner quote mentioned on the day. 30% of university accreditation will be done via blockchain by 2020.  It seems a little ambitious to me – not because of any blockchain technology limitations but because of the glacial speed that universities move at.  This merits more investigation so watch this space for a future blog on this topic as it’s one that interests me.
  • I heard some fabulous stories on the day – both from the public stage and a few more scandalous ones that were whispered quietly in the breaks. Stories are the other part of what makes the world go round.
  • I enjoyed the variety of the panel debates but especially the discussions about how to find & retain the right people for your team as you scale (there was a side discussion about ageism in the workplace and the massive missed opportunity this results in. See Greg Canty’s blog on this here if you’re interested in diversity in the workplace).
  • It was very useful to be reminded that most money can be made in fintech by focusing on the boring stuff – regulation, GDPR – and that early money in blockchain will be made addressing points in the ecosystem where trust is costly. I guess that’s why I’ll never be rich.  I can’t bring myself to work on boring stuff but I can see how it’s an opportunity.

My one regret of the day is that I missed Thomas Power‘s future trends talk in the afternoon but it was great to see Thomas in Dublin.

I’ll leave you today with a question one of the delegates asked me in the morning coffee break. I have £10k set aside for a new kitchen…should I spend the money on a new kitchen or invest it in a startup? I’ll leave you to decide what my answer was.

Startup recruitment – reject show-offs, clowns and mavericks …

Bryan Keating - possibly the world's best Chairman

Bryan Keating – possibly the world’s best Chairman

From the warmth of my temporary California base this week I noticed with interest that successful scaleup Futuregov is advertising publicly for an Executive Chair. Why with interest? Well really it’s because these types of appointments are so rarely advertised in a scaleup or SME.

This got me thinking about small business recruitment in general and what a dark art it is. Staying with the Exec Chair campaign for a moment, I can understand fully why Carrie & Dom are going down this route – it widens the selection pool beyond their own (extensive) networks and it’s a more transparent, open and fair process. But will it get them the right or best candidate? I’m not sure. Inevitably, processes that open some doors also close others.

In my world, the more usual way to bring someone into your small business as Chairman or a NED is to go out to your network and then make direct approaches to people, or a person, that you think may be suitable. A number of conversations take place behind closed doors and the “target” individual will make a decision based on any combination of the following and more – do they like your business, do they like you, how much else have they got going on right now, does your opportunity complement or conflict with their other current activities, can they see clearly how they will add value, what are you offering them, how’s it going to look on their own cv, are your exit aspirations linked to their available forward timescales, etc

Many of the sorts of people that I might approach if I was seeking an Executive Chair would never participate in a public recruitment process. They wouldn’t wish to be open and transparent in their dealings or intentions and they simply wouldn’t compete in a public way with others – definitely not. So well done Dom & Carrie for being brave enough to run a process that rules those people out and good luck with finding the right person.

There’s a wider issue here and one that I’d never really thought about much – despite having spent an awful lot of my own time during the past 10 years actively recruiting people into my own teams. At a dinner in Dublin last year I found myself sitting next to the head of a very, very large software company’s 2,000 person development team. We chatted away and inevitably the conversation turned to how difficult it is for a small business to recruit decent tech talent. My dinner companion at this point happened to say to me that he has a rule whereby he never recruits people via recruitment agencies or headhunters. Never. No exceptions. His reason for this was simple and straightforward. He believes that only second rate candidates use their services. He recruits only via his company’s new graduate programme and he sometimes interviews people recommended by others in his network or team. His further rationale when I challenged him a little on this was that he may occasionally miss a good person in this way, but the amount of time he saves by not bothering with or interviewing “bad” candidates was considerable and the trade-off was worth it. It also saved him from the nuisance factor that recruiters & headhunters introduce into your business – once they’ve placed a candidate with you they continue dialogue with your employee so that they don’t miss an opportunity later to make more commission when they can persuade that person to move again.

Later on I thought about my own career path and realised that I’ve only ever formally applied for two out of the numerous jobs I’ve had in my working life – once as a new graduate (I got my first job by applying via an advert placed in the Guardian) and again when I was moving to a new country (Northern Ireland in 2000) and didn’t have an existing network. Everything else I’ve ever done has come to me through my network.

Recruiting the right people into your team is the hardest job of any startup or scaleup CEO. I don’t care what any recruiter or HR person says about this, recruitment into your team is a nightmare and often it’s completely random as to whether or not the appointment you make turns out to be a success. Drawing up endless criteria and scoring lists of candidates against them? For the most part a complete waste of time and energy and it turns the process into something akin to the very worst excesses of procurement. Recently I’ve heard of a couple of people in my own network who’ve been encouraged to apply for vacant posts by the Chief Executives of those organisations. Both have gone on to apply & attend interview and both were unsuccessful. What’s that all about? Were they being used as stalking horses by unscrupulous Chief Execs wanting to make up their interview numbers or was it that the panel had a scoresheet that had to be adhered to on the day and therefore the Chief Exec was over-ruled or outvoted and their preferred candidate ousted by someone who happened to interview better on the day. (Rookie startup CEOs – this is something else to definitely watch out for – the professional interview performers – great at interview but by the end of Week 1, you realise with a sinking heart what a dreadful mistake you’ve made.)

Instead, satisfy yourself in the first 5 minutes that the candidate really wants to work in your organisation for the right reasons and has a clear view of where and how they can add value. Also, reject all show-offs, clowns and mavericks, no matter how interesting or compelling they seem. Believe me – all they will bring to you is a huge time sink and disharmony in your team.

For me, this is an interesting topic because despite having built world class startup teams several times over on a shoestring, recruitment is something I’ve struggled with over the years. I’ll readily admit that some of the worst and most personally painful mistakes I’ve ever made in business have been recruitment related.

Interested to hear your views, hints and tips for others on small business recruitment so please do share in the comments section below. The photo above is of Bryan Keating, the best Chairman I’ve ever worked with or for. Although having said that I’ve always loved the story about how the founders of the Innocent drinks company used to employ a 50p piece in the early days that they referred to as “The Chairman”. They flipped it for a simple heads or tails decision when required. I don’t know if the story’s true or not but certainly food for thought Dom & Carrie?

Going the extra mile…or why the little things in life really do matter

Extra Mile - Palm Springs style!

Extra Mile – Palm Springs style!

Do you remember this poem from your schooldays?

For want of a nail the shoe was lost,
for want of a shoe the horse was lost,
for want of a horse the knight was lost,
for want of a knight the battle was lost,
for want of a battle the kingdom was lost.
So a kingdom was lost—all for want of a nail.

I was fascinated by this story as a child and it’s a theme I often return to when I think about startups or small businesses. As an aside, the idea of a small issue leading on to something much bigger lends itself to many aspects of life outside business too – but more about that later.

In my mind, there are two ways that smart small businesses elevate themselves above basic bog-standard delivery and every new business struggles with either or both. Those organisations that can get these two things right effortlessly, consistently & with grace are the ones most likely to succeed.

The first part is about making sure that nothing important gets dropped. I know there’s a saying in startup land – “if the wheels don’t come off, you aren’t going fast enough”. Ignore this sort of silly “bro” culture nonsense when you’re starting your business – startup chaos is never fun from a customer perspective. If you can get efficient delivery right with some consistency in the early days as you expand beyond your founder team and early doors customers then you have a chance. It’s always very difficult to instil your founding team’s customer service ethic into your employee team. Fact. You can devise methods of measuring and monitoring customer service standards until the cows come home, but in my view the better way to tackle this when you’re starting out & beginning to expand and grow your team, is to focus on bringing the right people on board in the first place. People who already share your values and have the right mindset.

It’s ok to make a rare exception (maybe someone completely new to the workplace?) but really take care with your early recruits as those first team members are the foundation on which you’ll build out the next layer as you expand and then the layers after that. Never, ever employ someone who in the first 5 minutes of a job interview can’t articulate to you why they really want to work in your business and what specific value they will bring to you. That “better a hole than an xxxhole” statement is very true and one that I wish I’d paid attention to a bit more closely myself on several occasions – because you do really know in your gut whether or not someone is right to bring into your team. It’s all about creating the right sort of culture in that first wave of team members. If you get this wrong you are lost. In the course of my career, the most difficult customer issues I’ve ever had to resolve have been minor situations made worse by lack of communication or people in my own team lying to customers in order to cover their backs.

Also – everyone screws up from time to time. This is ok. The important thing is to learn as a team from mistakes made and to fix things for your customer as quickly and painlessly as possible for them. If you get this bit right, you could find yourself in an even better position with your customer because they’ve seen how you behaved in a time of adversity and they will admire you more if you’ve been honest.

The second part of this blog is more fun – once you’ve figured it out. What does “going the extra mile” actually look like in your particular business? I once heard Doug Richard say “any conversation with a customer is too short” – and he’s absolutely right. Without knowing why your customers buy from you instead of anyone else and which bit of what you provide they value most it’s pointless trying to go any extra miles as you could be wasting your time providing them with something that doesn’t really delight them and may even annoy them. U2’s music for example!

Everyone knows that startups have to over deliver. It’s one of the ways to get your first few precious customers – the ones that will hopefully go on to become ambassadors for you. Subsequently, stories about delivering customer delight and the resulting karma are legendary in entrepreneur circles. Hearing these tales from other entrepreneurs is one of my favourite pastimes and in my anecdote kitbag I have countless stories of huge contracts won on the back of a small act of kindness delivered at some point in the past. One is about a sales guy getting home at night & receiving a call from a school he’d just delivered some computer kit to that day. The teacher called him because he was delivering a presentation the next day & the printer cable he needed was missing. The sales guy didn’t complain, quibble or argue – he simply grabbed a cable from the office, turned the car around & drove the 70 miles back up the road to take it to the teacher with good grace. Years passed and the small computer company had pivoted & grown into something much bigger and different. The teacher changed jobs too and when he was looking for a supplier to provide an airport security system, he went back to that same sales guy.

My own favourite is a Learning Pool story. Sam Barbee & I went to a large and remote unitary local authority to deliver a lengthy sales presentation to a big group of people in a most unsuitable room. It was one of those rooms used for computer training and many of the people were hidden from view behind computer screens. We didn’t know anyone in the group and introductions weren’t made. The council had recently become a unitary authority, swallowing up the district councils in the process. Many of those in the room had been through long drawn out rounds of local government restructuring and were feeling fragile and bruised. Sam & I soldiered on with the presentation. Suddenly a woman at the back got to her feet and announced that in her previous role she’d been a Learning Pool customer in one of the district councils. Without waiting for permission, she launched into a tale about how she’d been working one day as administrator on her Council’s learning environment and had got it into a bit of a muddle. Tired and fed up she went home. Next morning she came into work with a feeling of trepidation, knowing she had to undo yesterday’s mess. She switched her computer on and immediately realised that her Learning Pool account manager had noticed overnight that she’d got herself into a muddle and without waiting to be asked, had gone in & fixed it for her. She finished off by saying that in all her years of working in local government she had never worked with a more customer focused supplier than Learning Pool. It was incredible. Sam & I could have kissed her. The atmosphere in the room changed in a heartbeat and 6 months later, after jumping through all the usual procurement hoops, the contract was ours.

But where do you draw the line? And how do you know what your own extra mile is? This is the tricky bit. As a small company you have to find ways to delight your customers that don’t eat too heavily into your margin – but you can only do that if you know your margins on your various products and services and the dependencies between them. So – know your customers and know what they want from you, know your margins and be aware across your team of where you have a bit of space to give a bit more. Delivering the extra mile doesn’t have to cost you a lot of money but you do need to give this some thought. If you get it right, it will pay you back in spades and you’ll sleep easier at night. A good start is to make a vow never to nickel and dime your customers from Day 1 and to always extend the same high level of courtesy from everyone in your team to everyone you deal with – no matter who they are.

I’d like to hear any of your stories about instances of a small act of kindness in business paying back many fold so please do share in the comments section below.

On a personal note, I keep a loose mental tally on favours I’ve done in business for others and favours I’m owed. I can’t help it – it’s the accountant in me wanting to classify everything in life into debits and credits. Don’t worry – I haven’t started noting it down in a ledger yet. I try to keep it so that I’m in credit with everyone in terms of favours I’ve done for them. I’ve done this all my working life and it’s only ever led to good things happening for me – and it means that when I really need a favour or need someone to pull me out of a hole, there are usually lots of people I can ask.

How to motivate your team…Lorraine Heggessey style

Last week Paul Webster (@watfordgap to the twitterati amongst you) & I were lucky enough to take a day out to represent Learning Pool at the Skills Third Sector conference.  The headline theme of the day was Our People, Our Skills, Our Future and we were keen to share with others what we’ve been working on for the past few years in other parts of the public sector.

Dame Mary Marsh addressing the Skills Third Sector Conference

Dame Mary Marsh of the Clore Social Leadership Programme was one of the keynote speakers.  Those of you who are familiar with the voluntary sector will be aware that Dame Mary has recently been appointed by the Cabinet Office to lead a review of leadership and skills which is due to be delivered in Spring 2013.  I was very encouraged that she spoke about now being a time for the sector to be bold and have the courage to do things differently and in a more entrepreneurial way.  Indeed, in a nutshell the key strands of the day that everyone kept returning to were:

  • the sector needs to invest in upskilling its people
  • better use can be made of technology to do things differently and in a more cost effective way
  • an opportunity exists to share more stuff both across the voluntary sector and between different sectors.

 

 

Nick Hurd, Minister for Civil Society

We listened to Nick Hurd (a man who has so far been a banker and an MP and who fears he may end up as a journalist or an estate agent) tell us about how he believes the sector must bring in more people with business skills as trustees.  He also made the very sensible observation that everything is always about the people and that leadership is especially important in times of significant change.  I was especially pleased to hear him suggest that the sector should take time to seek what is already out there and make use of it.  I have a dread of organisations or indeed entire sectors reinventing the wheel over & over again, simply because they haven’t taken the time to have a good look at what already exists – let’s face it – we’ve all seen that happen time & time again.

Later in the day Lord Victor Adebowale warned us that 88% of public sector cuts are still to come and he talked about the importance of collaboration and sharing learning across sectors.  Music to our ears.

Lorraine Heggessey, impressive career woman & role model

 

The speaker I really enjoyed, however, was Lorraine Heggessey, former BBC1 controller and the first woman to ever hold this post (despite the obvious handicaps of not being male, tall or having an Oxbridge background).  Lorraine talked to us about how managers & leaders can motivate their teams and make people feel valued in what they are doing.  These were a few of her suggestions and observations:

  • Think of your people as “talent” in the way that tv does and remember that talent is needy – Lorraine should know as Simon Cowell and Lord Sugar are just a couple of the people she’s had to work with
  • Remember that telepathy doesn’t work as a management tool, you have to rely on communication (Lorraine told us a story about how a colleague used to constantly arrive late for work & then spend 30 minutes chatting to her friend on the phone; her manager tried to deal with the situation by glaring at her & rolling her eyes, hoping she would take the hint.  Eventually the manager lost her temper and there was a big row.  The person simply said “you should’ve said” and from that moment onwards behaved at work in the way expected of her)
  • As a manager your behaviour is observed and noted – people in your team watch who you pay attention to & who you don’t pay attention to – it is noticed so be aware of that.
  • Greg Dyke ran a “cut the crap” programme at the BBC and asked staff what they wanted to change.  They said they wanted to stop tolerating maverick & diva behaviour from people in the team who won awards and critical acclaim.  They became known as the Bafta Bastards.  Greg tackled the issue & some of those people left the BBC.  So – think about who you are rewarding.  Every organisation has its stars but if you don’t manage & reward them carefully, you too could end up with a team of BBs
  • Watch out for people in the team falling out of someone’s favour & becoming “not very good” – it might be because they’ve been badly managed & demoralised.  Lorraine told us about how the BBC had a culture of not confronting poor performance but how managers would instead pass the person on to someone else.  All of us have seen that happen.  Better to address the root cause of any issue.
  • Manage by walking about – if you don’t spend time with your team you can’t manage them
  • Employ the best, not the easiest
  • Always employ people smarter than you when you get a chance
  • Spot when your people need to be challenged – if you don’t provide your team members with challenge they will get bored and leave.

Lorraine left us with a quote that I love “Everybody has a lot to learn from everybody”.  She also told us that she became a much better manager once she was a mother.

Fortunately, most of us are lucky enough not to work in environments like the BBC but still some good learns from Lorraine’s talk that are appropriate to most workplaces and teams.

Lorraine & Lord Victor finished by challenging the conference to start a movement to rename “the Third Sector” and to call it something else.  I’d be interested in hearing any suggestions you have in the comments below.  I know this has been a recurring theme for some years but maybe now is the right time to change to something more positive.

The Art of Leadership, Pittsburgh Steelers style

Dan_rooney_in_derry

On Thursday this week, I was lucky enough to be invited to an event in Derry where the great Dan Rooney was talking about leadership.  Dan Rooney is Chairman of the Pittsburgh Steelers (his father Art Rooney founded the team in 1933) and current US Ambassador to Ireland.  Last time I ran into him was in the White House in March – he was standing next to me.  Anyway – this is what he had to say.

He started by remarking on how much he likes the Hewlett Packard story – which endeared him to me straight away.  One of my favourite bits of the Jim Collins book, Good to Great, is the description of Level 5 leadership as demonstrated by Dave Packard & I just love the fact that his eulogy pamphlet described the great man as “Rancher, etc”.

As you would expect from someone with a lifelong immersion in competitive sports, Dan uses sports analogy to make all his points.  He talked about the 3 levels of leadership in his own sports world as being:

1.       The President as leader – the president’s role is similar to that of any business CEO.  They are responsible for setting the scene, making sure everyone’s doing their job, actually getting the players…I can relate to that.  I see recruitment as one of the most important things I do as a small business MD.  Dan himself was President of the Steelers from 1975 until 2002 & it’s clear from the way he talks about the role that it was something he enjoyed very much.

2.       The Head Coach as leader – the coach is responsible for all player related issues and for making sure the team is ready & able to play at their best on a Sunday.  The coach deals with any people issues and keeps everyone focused on winning.  The Steelers had only 3 coaches in 30 years.  Their legendary head coach, Chuck Noll, was there for 23 years (1969 to 1991)and 4 Superbowl wins, more than any other head coach in NFL history.  Impressive.  Noll is known for his meticulous attention to detail which included going back to basics with new players to the extent that he would re-train them in basic fundamentals that they would already be familiar with.

3.       The Player as leader – this one is interesting as it’s less obvious than the other two.  Dan Rooney cited the example of the intelligent player in the locker room that knows what’s going on & is willing to do what it takes.  He used the example of Steelers stalwart, (Mean) Joe Greene – leader and anchor of the “Steel Curtain” and one of the most dominant defensive players in the NFL during the 1970s.  A player with an intense desire to win, no matter what that would take, and who would rally everyone else on the team.

Dan Rooney left us with a great quote about leadership – “when things are good, always be at the back; when things are bad, always be in the front” – a variation on Jim Collins observation about the window & the mirror I believe.  Eloquent & to the point – rather like Ambassador Rooney himself.

Team Building’s great…but what happens next?

Team_lovely_august_2011

On 1 August Learning Pool turned 5 years old.  5 years is a significant milestone for any company and certainly time to take stock and work out what happens next.  We decided to spend 3 days together as a team in order to celebrate, have some informal time together (although Learning Pool is far from formal at the best of times) but also to revisit our plans and discuss our options as a group.

This photo of Paul & me with our team was taken on Derry’s new Peace Bridge last week – just before we split into 6 teams and scrambled all over the City on a fun treasure hunt.  We’re very proud of our team.  I doubt it’s possible to grow a sizeable team any quicker than 5 years, no matter how many management books you read or how impatient you are.  It’s like growing a harmonious flower bed or baking good bread.  There’s a method & stages to go through but at the end of the day, it takes a certain amount of time.

People have to form relationships & become comfortable with each other before they can perform well at anything.  It’s difficult to do this when the organisation is growing fast as there are new people joining the team all the time & “upsetting” the dynamic.  Everyone knows the Tuckman model of team formation and the 4 stages – forming, storming, norming, performing.  It can be hard to get onto those later stages when there is a constant influx of new team members.

When I look at the photo, 18 people or about one third of our team have been with us less than 12 months; 16 have been with us for over 3 years and the remaining 23 have been at Learning Pool between one & three years.  I often think about the Belbin exercise our team completed at our first team building event on Lusty Beg island in December 2008 when the company was just over 2 years old.  We had no co-ordinators & no implementers.  We had 2 completer finishers (fortunately!), one team worker, 2 plants and a solitary monitor-evaluator.  The remaining 24 people were crammed onto the resource investigator & shaper spaces – 12 apiece.  Things have changed since then, although some days I miss that early chaos.

My question to you all in this blog is how do other companies build on the success of team building days & keep the momentum going once your dispersed teams have dispersed again.  How do you keep that energy & focus going once everyone has waved goodbye and gone back to their day jobs?

One way to tell if a new team member is going to last the distance

Packed_tube

Anyone who knows me will know that like most techies (apologies for making such a broad generalisation – but most of my techie mates won’t mind I think) I’m a bit of a science fiction fan.  I’ve recently been re-watching Dark Skies which was on tv in 1997.  At the start of an episode called “Hostile Convergence”, John in a voiceover makes the following observation “I’ve heard that if you want to find out everything there is to know about somebody, all you have to do is drive across the country with them.”

It suddenly struck me that the same applies to travelling with your colleagues.  The Learning Pool team travels a lot.  Sometimes people travel alone, sometimes in pairs, occasionally the whole gang is on the move.  Travel stories form a big part of what we talk about around the campfire or when we all get together.  Spending a day with a colleague from 5am until 9.30pm and taking in two flights, 4 sales or customer meetings, a lot of train rides & cramming in your email & phone calls in around the edges – all under significant time pressures & frequently without enough to eat during the day – can put your working relationship under a bit of strain.

Funny when you think about it like that, isn’t it?  I’m lucky in that most of the people I usually travel with are easy company and a good laugh as well.  I’d love to hear your work travel stories.