Blockchain

My top 10 takeaways (& one regret) from #Fintech20Ireland

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(L-R) Thomas Olszewski of Frontline Ventures, Mary McKenna, Pete Townsend of Norio Ventures, Alan Costello of NDRC

On Thursday I was delighted to participate in #Fintech20Ireland at UCD as a speaker/panel member.  The audience was a mix of experienced fintech and blockchain professionals working across the financial and insurance services spectrum in Ireland and beyond.  Some were startup founders, some were thinking about starting companies, some were well established and experienced practitioners.  Others were financiers, investors & sponsors.  Thank you to Simon Cocking, John Armstrong and the rest of the Irish Tech News team for running the event and for inviting me to speak.

I talked (honestly) about my own experience of angel investing from the angel investor perspective & I also covered the right & wrong ways to go about “bagging” an angel like me from a founder or startup perspective.  I do this talk because I see so many founding teams getting this so wrong.  I’ve written my tips on “How to Catch an Angel” up recently as a blog here.

We’re living in a time when there are so many events happening that it’s more important than ever to make sure that events you run or attend generate value for you so I thought it would be a good exercise for me to summarise the value I derived from participating & being at #Fintech20Ireland.

These were my key takeaways from the day:

  • Networking – this is always going to be top of my list because I believe that having the right network is the solution to most challenges encountered in business. #Fintech20Ireland allowed me to catch up with people I already knew, meet some new people and meet in real life a few people I’ve known for a while online.  If a few quality additions to your existing network is the only benefit you derive from attending a conference or event then in my view that probably justifies the time you’ve spent.
  • Following on from the previous point, I got offered some work by someone in the audience who’d been looking for specialist e-learning expertise – pure happenstance that I’d mentioned my own e-learning background briefly in my intro.  Serendipity is always nice.
  • I got to meet some other early stage investors that I didn’t already know. As I always say angel investing is a team sport so it’s good for me to meet other investors & hear what they’re interested in and more to the point what they’re investing their time and money in.  It’s good for me but it’s also good for my portfolio companies as investment is usually an ongoing process so it’s useful to be on the radar of a lot of different people.
  • Meeting & hearing from the numerous innovative Irish companies who are transforming financial services and who were present on the day. Giles O’Neill from Enterprise Ireland reminded us early in the day exactly what Ireland has going for it in the fintech space – an existing ecosystem, multinationals & startups working side by side, good & improving international links (I noticed 10 new US routes announced by Aer Lingus yesterday & don’t forget you clear US immigration before you even leave Irish soil), coverage of global fintech hot spots by the EI in-country teams, previous huge international success of some Irish fintech companies.  Giles didn’t make this next point but I will.  Brexit clearly offers huge opportunity for Ireland in terms of fintech and indeed financial services.
  • I met Barbara Diehl, Director of UCD Innovation Academy. Barbara used to work at Said Business School Oxford & I’m a member of SBS’s network of experts.  Colleagues at SBS had made an email intro for us some months back but we’d never actually met.  Barbara was also moderating an innovation panel on the day so I got to see her at work before we had our chat.  It’s always useful to see if there’s anyone else from your wider network you can meet who works in the venue where the event you’re attending is taking place – especially if it’s a large university or corporate or government building.
  • My favourite quote of the day came from Charles Dowd, CEO of money messaging app Plynk. The “tips for startups” panel members were asked what success looks like.  Always a great question to ask a startup.  Charles replied “Success equals doing what you love – but with metrics”.  I love it.
  • There was an incredible Gartner quote mentioned on the day. 30% of university accreditation will be done via blockchain by 2020.  It seems a little ambitious to me – not because of any blockchain technology limitations but because of the glacial speed that universities move at.  This merits more investigation so watch this space for a future blog on this topic as it’s one that interests me.
  • I heard some fabulous stories on the day – both from the public stage and a few more scandalous ones that were whispered quietly in the breaks. Stories are the other part of what makes the world go round.
  • I enjoyed the variety of the panel debates but especially the discussions about how to find & retain the right people for your team as you scale (there was a side discussion about ageism in the workplace and the massive missed opportunity this results in. See Greg Canty’s blog on this here if you’re interested in diversity in the workplace).
  • It was very useful to be reminded that most money can be made in fintech by focusing on the boring stuff – regulation, GDPR – and that early money in blockchain will be made addressing points in the ecosystem where trust is costly. I guess that’s why I’ll never be rich.  I can’t bring myself to work on boring stuff but I can see how it’s an opportunity.

My one regret of the day is that I missed Thomas Power‘s future trends talk in the afternoon but it was great to see Thomas in Dublin.

I’ll leave you today with a question one of the delegates asked me in the morning coffee break. I have £10k set aside for a new kitchen…should I spend the money on a new kitchen or invest it in a startup? I’ll leave you to decide what my answer was.

What’s In A Day?

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In just under 6 weeks time we move back home to Northern Ireland after spending the last 4 years slap bang in the centre of London.  I’m a little panicked by the thought of everything I still have to do in my remaining 42 days…or is it now 41…or maybe even 40.  The last time I glanced at the list in my book there are some 50 or so people I’m hoping to catch up with for a coffee before I go and I have another list on the go of places & restaurants I want to visit.  All of this got me thinking about how we choose to spend each of our days.  UK life expectancy is currently 81.5 years and that equates to just shy of 30,000 days on earth.  Seems like a lot doesn’t it?  Indeed, one of the most chilling questions I’ve heard posed recently was at TedXBrixton a couple of years back when Peter Cochrane, futurologist, asked the audience what quartile of their lives they considered themselves to be in.  (I’m hoping & praying I’m in my 3rd & not 4th).

So – how do you spend each of your days?  This is what I did with mine yesterday:

6.30-8.30am Woke up, listened to R4 Today programme (even though it makes me angry & I do sometimes end up shouting at the radio – any credible alternatives gratefully received) & read online – news, articles, email, Twitter.  My favourite piece on the radio yesterday was hearing John Caudwell (founder of Phones 4U & famous for being the UK’s biggest ever tax payer) preaching about tax avoidance in the midst of the #PanamaPapers row.  I don’t agree with John’s politics or his stance on Europe but I do believe that everyone should pay their fair taxes.

8.30am-midday I spent this time making a number of connections for entrepreneurs I’ve met with this week & last.  One of the most important parts of networking is not attending events & collecting business cards for yourself; it’s making useful connections for others & bringing people together for the greater good of the group.  All the best networkers I know – Oli Barrett, Marc Ventresca, Denise McQuaid, Tom Holmes, Sinead Crowley – all operate along the same lines – in order to get it back, first you have to give it away.  This month for me is all about blockchain (I’m looking at potential applications of blockchain for the wider public sector & have a few interesting meetings coming up so watch this space) and social prescribing so this morning I had a great Skype call with the guys at Bitnet Technologies in Belfast & another Skype call with a couple of Irish entrepreneurs who’ve got an interesting community driven social prescription model & solution.  I also answered a large number of emails – my least favourite part of yesterday – and I noticed that the UFI Trust have this week announced their VocLearnTech Fund 2016 so I had a quick Skype with Sarah Axon to find out a bit more about it before promoting it out to my networks.  It’s open until 12 May & you can find more info here if you’re interested in applying.

Midday-1.30 Time for a swim.  I try to swim a mile every day if I can.  I’m lucky in that there’s a 20m pool in the basement of the apartment block we’re renting in.  I treat it like meditation – no phones, no emails – just your own head & your own thoughts.

Laugardalslaug

The 50m outdoor pool at Laugardalslaug in Reykjavik

It’s an incredible way to settle your head & solve problems or challenges you’re struggling with.  I had the pool to myself yesterday which is always a bonus.  I’m a slow swimmer but that’s ok.  When I started back in the pool on 29 December my time for a mile was 1 hour.  Yesterday it was 49 minutes.  I like visible improvement, even if it’s gradual.  My best swim this year so far was in the outdoor 50m pool at Laugardalslaug in Reykjavik.  It was January and in the middle of a fierce snowstorm – but the water in the pool is geothermally heated to the temperature of a warm bath and it was amazing to feel the icy snowflakes landing on your shoulders and back.  Swimming is a real pleasure these days as it was something that I had to give up when I was in a startup – I just couldn’t spare the time.

1.30-4pm Phone calls with associates, new people in my network, a couple of people that I’m working with, a chat with my Mum (very important to make that call every day), a nice call with the team from the Centre for Entrepreneurship at the University of Oxford that I’m hoping to work with this year.

Maxine

Nice to run into my friend & fellow Northern Irish lass Maxine Mawhinney last night

I believe it’s important to chat with people on the phone or via Skype.  You don’t build meaningful relationships with anyone via email.  A couple of interesting emails dropped into my inbox yesterday afternoon – one unsolicited from a high end recruiter asking me if I’d like to apply to become a trustee of a charity that I’m already well known to.  It did make me wonder why they’re paying good money to recruiters to bring them people that they could just lift the phone & call but hey-ho.  That’s a discussion for another day.

4-6pm Wrote this blog, got ready for a dinner at the Irish Embassy & caught the bus down to Belgravia.  An evening in the Embassy is always one of my favourite nights out in London.

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Liz Shanahan, IIBN Global Chair, welcoming last night’s dinner guests

I see lots of people that I already know but also meet interesting new people as there’s no shortage of them passing through our Embassy.  This is largely down to our Ambassador – Dan Mulhall – who is a remarkable mix of diplomat, historian and story teller & who along with his extremely interesting Australian wife Greta hosts the most welcoming & eclectic of gatherings.  Last night was no exception.  I sit on the London board of the Irish International Business Network and, like any organisation that cares about succession planning, we run a Future Leaders programme.  Last night’s dinner was to celebrate the success of our latest cohort and 4 of our young people stood up & shared their stories.

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London Irish rugby player & former international, Ulster & Grand Slammer Tom Court, now an edtech entrepreneur

It was incredibly moving to listen to them – one is a rugby star turned tech entrepreneur, one is a former social innovator turned healthy food producer, one is a lawyer and one has left his City career behind & is starting a property portfolio – and we have 50 more like them.  As the Ambassador said at the end of the evening – “We can all relax – our future is in safe hands”.  The Irish diaspora is an amazing thing – I often wonder how people who aren’t Irish manage.

10.45 I left the Embassy with a head buzzing with ideas from the conversations I’d had, caught the bus home & went straight to bed, thanking my lucky stars that I’m part of such a wonderful set of networks.

I’m fortunate in that all my days are different from each other & these days I have a lot of freedom in how I choose to spend my time.  It’s a great gift, although there’s no doubt it took many years of hard work to unlock it.

Make each one of your days count.  None of us really know how many of them we have left…